Peritech's-Blog

Think Your Idea Is Not Good Enough For Application Development?

- Friday, February 07, 2014

Your Idea Not Good Enough For Application Development? by Khris Morrison


Got a great idea on a new business or product? Have you ever thought it would be nice if there was software to help you in the endless cycle of paperwork?  Or, have you said to yourself, "My staff would get more done if they did not have to track everything in Excel!"  You might even find yourself wishing for an app that gives real time updates on sales figures.  You are not alone.  In today's world of software development, those ideas and dreams can come true.

It's amazing how many times I hear about clients that actually use Microsoft Excel to maintain inventory, customer phone numbers and addresses for mailings, or to perform simple everyday tasks such as creating an invoice.  These clients may spend hours or even days performing these tasks that, with the right application, would take minutes.  These same clients are often reluctant to meet with a software developer because they think it would be too expensive to make their ideas a reality.

Carlos Santana once said, "Everything starts with an idea, with imagination."  Imagination and vision are vital to the success of a business if we don't let our minds get in the way.  A lot of people have great ideas but lack effort in making them reality.  Most of us have heard the story of Steve Jobs, who started out in his garage only to become the visonary and CEO behind Apple, Inc. And what about Michael Dell building PC's in his dorm room only to go on and build a multi billion-dollar company we know today as "Dell Computers"?  These men are no different than you and I but are set apart by the effort they put behind positioning their idea with the right resources to make it happen.

Cost should not be the only deciding factor in your pursuit of a great idea.  It's important to find a great company with honest and hard-working software engineers willing to take the time to listen to your ideas, understand your needs, be mindful of a budget, and capable of putting the right people in place.  You, as the client, should feel like no question is a bad one to ask.  It's about creating a partnership where the client, project manager and/or software engineer work toward a common goal together.  I've had the pleasure of working with clients who took a simple idea and grew it into something effective and they were proud of. This is the desired outcome and will be the end result  when a company uses best practice solutions and maintains integrity for their clients.

To find a company that you can trust, you need to ask yourself some very important questions.  "Does this company have experience in the field that I'm in? or "what is their customer base" or "What kind of reputation do they  have?"  It it's a mobile solution, you should ask yourself if your idea needs to run on mobile devices such as Apple's iPad and iPhone, Microsoft's Surface tablets or any other tablet running Windows 8?  Many software development companies are keen on developing mobile responsive applications (also known as mobile web applications) that can run on most devices. However, if you are considering a native application, which is built to only run on a specific mobile device, the software development company should be capable of developing that as well. For a successful outcome, it's about understanding the end result and working with the best team possible.

Next time, I will share my thoughts and go into detail about creating a mobile application and provide the pros and cons on building a Mobile Web app versus a Native app.  Stay Tuned!

Lessons From Southwest Airlines

- Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Book Review  By LeighAnne Turner



I just finished reading a fantastic book that everyone in a position of leadership should consider investing time to read.  “Lessons In Loyalty: How Southwest Airlines Does It-An Insider’s View is written by former Southwest Airlines employee, Lorraine Grubbs-West. Southwest Airlines is considered one of the top 5 best companies to work for with an employee turnover rate of less than 10%! Through her years working in the Marketing department, Lorraine has gained an understanding of the inner methodology of Southwest Airlines and their success over the past 30 years.
 

What can you learn from a company that has been recognized for such excellent and consistent customer service?  It all starts with the inside of your organization and spreads outward to the public.  Employees want to learn and grow in their roles and not stagnate.  It is the responsibility of those in management and leadership roles to facilitate that growth. The result is a corporate ethos, like that of Southwest Airlines, that creates a culture of trust and cooperation. It is that cooperation and trust that manifests an attitude of hard work, effort and teamwork within the entire organization. The book is broken down into 9 Loyalty Lessons that are essential to a cohesive atmosphere.



  • Hire Attitude-Train Skills - The principle of hiring nice because you can’t train nice. This means choosing employees who can get along with others, who are respectful, want to be at their job and make efforts to innovate. These people should have values that match the organization.

 

  • Immerse everyone in the Culture Immediately - Establish an environment that enables employees to identify with the organization and makes them feel valued.

 

  • Keep ‘Em Learning- There should be professional development opportunities for all employees that has an emphasis on providing training opportunities that promotes the expertise and experience of the leaders.

 

  • People Give as Good as They Get - Cultivating an insight into the importance of finding value while recognizing and appreciating employees in a systemic manner.

 

  • Find the Kid in Everyone - Empowering employees to have fun while communicating with customers.

 

  • Do More with Less - Invest in keeping employees busy. Why? Because being busy contributes to people feeling needed and valued within the organization.

 

  • Luv ‘Em in the Tough Times – Take care of employees when they are personally going through difficult times.. We ALL hit those times where life just seems to beat you down. Build them up rather than tear them down.

 

  • Do What’s Right - Do the right thing even when it is not by the book.

 

  • Nurture the Corporate Family - Develop a sense of family and realize that people are a part of something much larger than themselves. This results in a team that will continually work together towards a focused goal.    



  • This was an excellent book written with a creative and unique perspective from someone who knows firsthand the inner workings of that organization. The 9 insights that are highlighted can be practical lessons for promoting a culture that encourages productivity, hard work and overall success.


A Person’s #1 Reason for Not Trying Your Service

- Friday, October 18, 2013

A Person's #1 Reason For Not Trying Your Service  By LeighAnne Turner



People are busy. Anything outside of the normal work flow is considered “extra work”, even if it’s intended to be a time saver. We first fix the problems that will be the biggest boost to our bottom line and everything else comes second.  The barriers of switching services, platforms or anything they may have “made due” with in their business can be overcome by looking into the lens of your customer and visualizing the potential benefits that they would receive. It’s not enough to “be better” or claim to have the ultimate money saving service. Busy people live in the here and now with a third eye glancing at tomorrow.  They want to solve tomorrow’s issues, but they need to confidently resolve what today holds first. 


This article by Tara Hunt, a social media strategist, researcher, author and speaker makes suggestions on how to acknowledge the cost of switching and offers solutions for addressing such costs that impart a more intrinsic business and unequivocal customer service experience.  It also delves deeper into a pressing question of whether we should be selling the solution…or the problem. Aside from good practice management, coming from a customer approach is a great way to differentiate between what’s most important and what gets tossed on an incidental or secondary “to do” list.